What We Do

                   Millers' cleaners is determined to help improve the quality of life for all Wichitans.  Therefore it is our responsibility to reduce the amount of waste we deposit in landfills.  We have poly bag recycling containers placed, for our customers' convenience, at all of our stores.  If a bag makes it to the landfill we also use biodegradable poly bags to package garments thus reducing the time a bag stays in the landfill before decomposition.  We recycle at the "Miller Recycling center” loose poly, cardboard boxes, mixed paper products and plastic bottles.  Because the recycling center does not take wire hangers we try to reuse returned hangers and provide customers with a handy sorting and carrying case.  For our shirt laundry, we are using a polypropylene (plastic) hanger that is completely recyclable, reuseable, and emits very little toxins if thrown away.  Finally, our cleaning process uses petroleum solvent.  Petroleum based solvents do not emit toxic or environmental waste that can seep into groundwater causing toxic plumes.  


As a service to our community we proudly accept donations for "Dress for Success Wichita" at all of our Millers' locations.  Gently used ladies suits, jackets, pants and blouses can be left at our locations during business hours and we will take them to "Dress for Success Wichita".  The donations are tax deductible and make a major impact in the lives of many women in our community.




  

Miller's Cleaners began in September 1977 by Dan and Betty Miller.  Their first location was Minsia Cleaners near North High School.  The second location was in Seneca Square and the Double Indian head logo was established, signifying to the Miller's that no matter what came their way, they had one another's back. Miller's Cleaners has undergone quite few changes through the years and in 2012, Dan and Betty Miller decided it was time to retire passing the totem to their son Craig Miller. Now we use the term retired loosely when it comes to Dan, as he can still be found at our production plant everyday. Betty Miller on the other hand enjoys the daily activities of retirement. Betty spends her time with the grand kids and they keep her plenty busy.  Craig Miller following the family tradition has dedicated himself to running the family business. Making improvements to not only the business but also to improving the environment, by lessening the company's carbon imprint. With recycling programs at each of his locations for customers to utilize, his efforts to make the world a better place can be seen through out the company. We use plastic hangers on our shirts and all of our poly bags are bio-degradable. We offer hanger caddies to make it easier for our customers to participate as well. Miller's recycles all plastic, steel, paper and cardboard used within the company.



Broken buttons:
Buttons break for a variety of reasons but in the laundry process the two most common are 1. poor press padding and 2. use of non-pliable buttons in manufacturing.  Press padings breakdown after repeat usage we change our pads according to machine standards of 20,000 shirts between changes.  Non-pliable buttons are sometimes used by manufactures to lower unit cost increasing profitability.  These buttons become brittle after laundering and crack.  Pliable buttons become soft during the laundering process allowing them to cool and retain their strength.


When Can a Shirt be Commercially Laundered?

The specialized equipment used in commercial laundry as pictured above requires a garment that meets specific qualifications.  First, a prospective garment should be made of a fabric and design that is able to be pressed or finished on a warm or hot iron setting.  Second, the garment should button from the collar to the tail so it will fit around the shirt pressing apparatus.  Third, the garment should should not have loose ruffles or over-sized puffy sleeves.  Finally, the item should have buttons that are not susceptible to heat damage, pressure damage or extra agitation of the commercial laundry process.


How is dry cleaning done?

The process of dry cleaning is utilizing equipment that resembles a large washing machine that uses a petroleum based solvent, as in our case type 140 F and DF2000, as a cleaning medium instead of water.  Petroleum solvent is a liquid that dissolves other solids or liquids that appear on garments but does not contain the most common solvent, water.  Once the items are cleaned they are then dried at a temperature not exceeding 170 degrees fahrenheit.  After drying the garments are finished on a low moisture steam press and sent for inspection and packaging. 

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Miller's

Dan Miller                          Craig Miller                          Caryl Gibson                      Donna Miller-Tobler           Miguel Garcia

Founder                                Owner                                  General Manager              Dry Cleaner/                               Dry Cleaner

                                                                                                                                                         Wedding gown specialist                             

                                                               We can be found at Our Main Production Facility